Tag Archives: municipalities

October 21: Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion Webinar (Free to Members Only)

Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion Webinar

Free to Members, Pre-registration required.

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Diversity, equity, and inclusion (DEI) are three distinct ingredients that some feel are missing from the American Pie. They are equally imperative to changing the trajectory of today’s workplace. Systemic racism has not only found its place on our streets, social media, and politics, but in our business.

Failure to properly address DEI in the workforce will inevitably affect employee morale, efficiency, and productivity. How do we create an environment that is receptive to DEI? Verna Myers, vice president of inclusion strategy at Netflix, once said “Diversity is being asked to the party. Inclusion is being asked to dance.” Only through a comprehensive understanding of DEI and new ways of doing business and viewing employees, especially those within minority groups, will companies begin to create change.

This session is intended to show how open dialogue can be productive and break down barriers and myths to educate some on the why behind the movement; and t look at the root of the issues and learn to better and more openly listen to our fellow employees.


Tiffany Smith bio pixTiffany Smith is the Director of the Parking Authority of River City in Louisville, Ky.  She has worked for PARC for 25 years.  She leads a diverse staff of 32 employees with a focus on employee engagement and a commitment to superior customer service.  Her operations include 15 garages, three surface lots and 4,800 on-street spaces.  Her department recently earned IPMI’s Accreditation Parking Organization with Distinction certification.  She is a member of various boards and organizations and in her free time, enjoys playing tennis.  She loves parking, people, and living with a purpose.

 

 

 


Mike Tudor, CAPP, is the Assistant Director of the Parking Authority of River City (PARC), Inc. in Louisville, Ky.,where he has worked since 1997 within key off-street and on-street operational, management, and leadership roles.  He currently serves as President of the Midsouth Transportation and Parking Association (MSTPA) with a previous role of Secretary since 2015. He serves on the IPMI State and Regional Association Committee. He holds an undergraduate degree from Cincinnati Christian University (CCU).  He spent the early part of his career in all aspects of parking with the private sector to include management of private lots, garages, and valet services.  He earned his CAPP certification in 2019. Mike has a passion for God, family, outdoor activities, and supporting inclusion in the parking industry.

Submit your questions and thoughts for the discussion to Kim Fernandez at fernandez@parking-mobility.org.

November 19: Free Online Shoptalk: The Financial Picture: Build Your 2021 Budget (and Beyond) Despite Disruption and Revenue Shortfalls

Free Online Shoptalk: The Financial Picture: Build Your 2021 Budget (and Beyond) Despite Disruption and Revenue Shortfalls

Free to all industry professionals.

Register here.


Join IPMI for our next online Shoptalk addressing the parking, transportation, and mobility industry’s response and recovery planning. Open to all, join us for discussions centered on best practices, next steps, and the challenges ahead.

Submit your questions and thoughts for the discussion on the registration page. 

Moderated by Sam Veraldi, CAPP. 

Free Online Shoptalk: Looking Back, Planning Ahead: Leaving 2020 in the Dust and Building a Better 2021, Moderated by Casey Jones, CAPP

Looking Back, Planning Ahead: Leaving 2020 in the Dust and Building a Better 2021, Moderated by Casey Jones, CAPP


December 16, 2:00 pm – 3:00 pm ET

Pre-registration required to attend.  Free to all industry professionals. Registration coming soon.

Join IPMI for our next online Shoptalk addressing the parking, transportation, and mobility industry’s response and recovery planning. Open to all, join us for discussions centered on best practices, next steps, and the challenges ahead.


Shoptalk Summary 

How can we hit the ground running to make 2021 a year of recovery and rebounding for parking and mobility?  We have provided a deep dive into data and takeaways from the IPMI Industry Response & Recovery Benchmarking Survey; now it’s time to shift our mindset.

Let us know how decisions are being made, what you and your team need now, and how the industry is responding in every sector.  Share your plans and hear what other organizations are doing to plan for the year ahead.

This conversation will be solutions-based.  Bring your progressive, innovative, and inspired ideas and concepts to share with the IPMI community to create a more vibrant and adaptable transportation and mobility ecosystem.

Submit your questions and thoughts for the discussion on the registration page.


Casey Jones, CAPP, DESMAN

Casey Jones, CAPP, is a recognized transportation and parking industry leader with more than 24 years of  industry experience overseeing parking and transportation programs in the Pacific Northwest and at the University of Colorado and Boise State University.  He’s spent the past 10 years providing consulting and project management services to universities, cities, and hospitals, focusing on improving customer satisfaction, operational effectiveness, and financial performance.  His public and private sector operational experience complements his strong project management skills and experience.  He joined DESMAN in August 2019. He is a past chairman of the Board for the International Parking & Mobility Institute (IPMI). He serves on the Accredited Parking Organization (APO) Board of Directors and is a Board Director for the California Public Parking Association and Pacific Intermountain Parking and Transportation Association.

IPMI Webinar: Curbing COVID-19 at the Curb. Presented by Matthew Darst, Conduent Transportation.

Curbing COVID-19 at the Curb

Matthew Darst, JD; Director of Curbside Management; Conduent Transportation

Register here for this webinar.

Or purchase the entire 2021 professional development series bundle.


How we think about traveling and commuting in the cities where we work and live has changed dramatically with the spread of COVID-19 . We drive less, eschew public transportation, and are less likely to use shared mobility devices.  This new definition of mobility has exacerbated declining municipal revenues. Cities and states face a unique challenge: stimulate local economies and generate revenue all while working to reopen responsibly to prevent new hot spots of infection and protect public health.

Curbside technologies offer unique solutions to help fund government programs while safeguarding the public. Curbside technologies can help monitor and mitigate viral spread, provide economic relief to constituents, and create a path for municipal revenue recovery. Cities have an opportunity to quickly pivot and utilize metered parking, permit parking, citation issuance and processing, and data science to achieve critical municipal goals.

Attendees will:

  • Identify curbside strategies for reducing the risk of contagion, providing relief to customers, and helping fund critical municipal goals.
  • Assess curbside data for its effectiveness as an early indicator of people congregating/flaunting social distancing guidelines, the need for enforcement, and the spread of COVID-19.
  • Detail best practices and measure the effectiveness of amnesty and relief programs for constituents and revenue recovery efforts.

Offers 1 CAPP Credit towards application or recertification.


 

Presenter:

Matthew Darst, JD; Director of Curbside Management; Conduent Transportation

Matt Darst, JD, oversees Conduent Transportation’s analytics team, helping cities use data to better manage curbside resources to promote social equity, improve pedestrian safety, and increase physical distancing during the pandemic. Prior to joining Conduent, he served in the public sector for 16 years.

Register here.

Free Online Shoptalk: From Disruption to Adaptation: Legal and Policy Implications for Cities and Transit in the Wake of COVID-19

From Disruption to Adaptation: Legal and Policy Implications for Cities and Transit in the Wake of COVID-19

Download the Shoptalk here.

Dive into relevant data and takeaways from the IPMI Industry Response & Recovery Benchmarking Survey. Discuss observations and recent trends, and examine how mobility system shifts are creating challenges to existing municipal legal and policy structures. Explore how decisions are being made, what’s needed now, and how cities are responding. This Shoptalk will focus primarily on municipalities and public agencies, and all are welcome to attend.


Our Moderator

Kathryn Hebert, Director Transportation, Mobility, and Parking, City of Norwalk, CT


Kathryn is a strategic visionary leader bringing together the best ideas and people from public and private sectors to innovate and transform communities. For over 30 years, she has been instrumental in the resurgence of Norwalk, Connecticut, with changes made possible by reimagining transportation, parking, mobility, and all supporting components. Equally adept at managing the business of government, enlisting resources, and partnering with private sector organizations to achieve goals. Kathryn is currently the Director of Transportation, Mobility, and Parking for the City of Norwalk, Conn. As a critical part of the City of Norwalk Economic Development Team, she directs the City’s Transportation, Mobility and Parking Department providing oversight, leadership and management to create and implement convenient and safe mobile connectivity between neighborhoods, business districts and major transportation hubs through coordinated planning, engineering, operations and community collaborations. She is an elected member of the IPMI Board of Directors and is the Immediate Past President of the New England Parking Council.

Free Online Shoptalk: Planning for What’s Next: Roadmap to Recovery the Parking, Transportation, and Mobility Industry

Planning for What’s Next: Roadmap to Recovery the Parking, Transportation, and Mobility Industry

Download the Shoptalk here.

Join IPMI for our next online Shoptalk addressing the parking, transportation, and mobility industry’s response and recovery planning. Open to all, join us for discussions centered on best practices, next steps, and the challenges ahead.

Our moderator for this shoptalk:

Carmen Donnell, CAPP, Vice President, Sales, West

Carmen brings more than a decade of parking, transportation, and mobility industry experience alongside a keen interest in relationship management. Carmen is a respected sales leader and an active participant in many industry organizations. As such, Carmen prides herself in viewing parking solutions from the client’s perspective. She has the knowledge and background to customize operations to serve any need. As VP, Sales, West, Carmen is responsible for functional aspects and members of the sales team in the central and western US, and Canada. Working closely alongside the CEO, the VP, Sales, East, and other operative departments at PayByPhone, Carmen’s top focus is to deliver results that are aligned with PayByPhone’s overall growth strategy.

Free Online Shoptalk: The Leading Edge – Response, Reopening, and Recovery for the Parking, Transportation, and Mobility Industry

Download the Shoptalk here.

Join IPMI for our next online Shoptalk addressing the parking, transportation, and mobility industry’s response and recovery planning. Open to all, moderator Gary Means, CAPP, will lead the group in discussions centered on best practices, next steps, and the challenges ahead.

We understand this is an extremely busy time and will record the online shoptalk and distribute to all members and colleagues. If you have a question or would like to share something that has worked for your organization in advance, please email Fernandez@parking-mobility.org.


Gary A. Means, CAPP, Executive Director, Lexington & Fayette County Parking Authority

Gary is a Certified Administrator of Public Parking (CAPP) with a BA in Broadcasting from Eastern Kentucky University. Gary is a member of the International Parking & Mobility Institute Board of Directors and Chair Elect on their Executive Committee. Locally, Gary serves on several boards/committees including Lexington Area MPO Bike Pedestrian Advisory Committee, Town Branch Park Partners and Downtown Lexington Partnership. In 2000, he received Downtown Lexington Corporation’s “Outstanding Individual” Award. Gary has worked in the parking industry for over 25 years in both the public and private sectors. Gary and his wife Melissa have two children and three grandchildren.

IPMI News: Industry Effort Requests $30B in Additional Municipal Stimulus Funding

The International Parking & Mobility Institute (IPMI), with a coalition of municipalities requests additional stimulus funds of $30B to support cities providing essential services in response to COVID-19.

Read the Open Letter to Congress below. 

Share your support. Municipality representatives, click the link to sign the letter.


July 14, 2020

To: U.S. Senate and House of Representatives Leadership, Senate Committee on Commerce, Science & Transportation and House Transportation & Infrastructure Committee Members

From: International Parking & Mobility Institute (IPMI) on behalf of municipal parking and mobility organizations

The International Parking & Mobility Institute (IPMI) commends your commitment to protecting Americans during the COVID-19 pandemic and your leadership in passing the CARES Act to mitigate the direct impact to businesses. However, significant additional funding is needed for municipalities and cities facing ongoing and protracted challenges and disruption.

The restaurant, airline, and events industries have suffered a direct and immediate impact from pandemic-related shutdowns; it’s important to recognize that the parking and transportation industry underlies each of these industries. Parking is one of the most important urban mobility infrastructures, facilitating the daily needs of more than 100 million commuters and businesses across the country – every single day.

Parking is the foundation of municipal economic activity and a critical resource for businesses, their employees, first responders, tourists, and many others. The parking industry contributes to the U.S. economy by directly employing 580,000+ individuals and generating over $130 billion in annual revenue.

As the largest collective operators of parking facilities in the country, municipalities rely heavily on parking and transportation revenue to fund local budgets, transportation systems, and city programs.

The importance of parking-related revenue may be even more significant for smaller municipalities. Per Henry Servin, Parking Manager at the City of Santa Monica, Calif., “Parking contributes 30%+ revenue to Santa Monica’s General Fund every year.”

The impact of the COVID-19 crisis on municipalities cannot be understated. With a 50-70%+ drop in commuter activity and a 95%+ decrease in visitor revenue observed from real-time data in cities across the U.S., municipalities will likely incur a $30B loss of revenue in the next 12 months, resulting in significant employee layoffs.

Parking authorities and offices of our respective cities are avidly working to curb operational expenses in an effort to mitigate impact, but this alone cannot resolve the crisis they face.

We respectfully seek $30B in the upcoming stimulus bill be earmarked specifically for municipal governments. This funding will support services to businesses and residential communities throughout the country.

Municipalities provide essential services to 200 million residents and are in need of federal government relief. With your assistance, we can ensure that critical services are maintained, while helping to materially contribute to the economic recovery of our cities.

IPMI News: Industry Effort to Support $30B in Additional Municipal Funding during Pandemic. Sign the Open Letter before Wednesday, July 22.

Over the next few weeks, Congress is working on a potential third stimulus package to assist various sectors of the U.S. economy. The International Parking & Mobility Institute (IPMI), with a coalition of municipalities, is requesting an additional $30B to support cities providing essential services in response to COVID-19.

Read the Open Letter to Congress below. 

IPMI is asking for your support before Wednesday, July 22, 2020.  Municipality representatives, click the link to support the effort and sign the letter.


July 14, 2020

To: U.S. Senate and House of Representatives Leadership, Senate Committee on Commerce, Science & Transportation and House Transportation & Infrastructure Committee Members

From: International Parking & Mobility Institute (IPMI) on behalf of municipal parking and mobility organizations

The International Parking & Mobility Institute (IPMI) commends your commitment to protecting Americans during the COVID-19 pandemic and your leadership in passing the CARES Act to mitigate the direct impact to businesses. However, significant additional funding is needed for municipalities and cities facing ongoing and protracted challenges and disruption.

The restaurant, airline, and events industries have suffered a direct and immediate impact from pandemic-related shutdowns; it’s important to recognize that the parking and transportation industry underlies each of these industries. Parking is one of the most important urban mobility infrastructures, facilitating the daily needs of more than 100 million commuters and businesses across the country – every single day.

Parking is the foundation of municipal economic activity and a critical resource for businesses, their employees, first responders, tourists, and many others. The parking industry contributes to the U.S. economy by directly employing 580,000+ individuals and generating over $130 billion in annual revenue.

As the largest collective operators of parking facilities in the country, municipalities rely heavily on parking and transportation revenue to fund local budgets, transportation systems, and city programs.

The importance of parking-related revenue may be even more significant for smaller municipalities. Per Henry Servin, Parking Manager at the City of Santa Monica, Calif., “Parking contributes 30%+ revenue to Santa Monica’s General Fund every year.”

The impact of the COVID-19 crisis on municipalities cannot be understated. With a 50-70%+ drop in commuter activity and a 95%+ decrease in visitor revenue observed from real-time data in cities across the U.S., municipalities will likely incur a $30B loss of revenue in the next 12 months, resulting in significant employee layoffs.

Parking authorities and offices of our respective cities are avidly working to curb operational expenses in an effort to mitigate impact, but this alone cannot resolve the crisis they face.

We respectfully seek $30B in the upcoming stimulus bill be earmarked specifically for municipal governments. This funding will support services to businesses and residential communities throughout the country.

Municipalities provide essential services to 200 million residents and are in need of federal government relief. With your assistance, we can ensure that critical services are maintained, while helping to materially contribute to the economic recovery of our cities.

Curbside Management in a Recurring Emergency Scenario: A Municipal Perspective

Closed roadway lanes for widened pedestrian way in Cleveland Park, Washington, D.C.

By Benito O. Pérez, AICP CTP, CPM; and David Carson Lipscomb, MCP

This post is part of a special series on curb management and COVID-19. A joint effort of IPMI, Transportation for America, and ITE’s Complete Streets Council, this series strives to document the immediate curbside-related actions and responses to COVID-19, as well as create a knowledge base of strategies that communities can use to manage the curbside during future emergencies.

For all of us, 2020 will be the year the world changed. Seemingly overnight the hustle and bustle of life and commerce in our cities went nearly silent under government-mandated shelter-in-place orders aimed to stop the spread of COVID-19. Overwhelmed healthcare networks and essential businesses that help meet our most basic needs were thrown into crisis. This is a common reality after natural disasters like hurricanes, earthquakes, and floods. However, unlike those events, this is simultaneously a prolonged and global experience.

Municipal governments are vital to protecting our communities, tasked with coordinating resources to address this public health emergency while maintaining order and normalcy for residents. Curbside and parking professionals across the country have supported their municipal responses by ensuring prioritized, optimal transportation network operations in innovative, rapid-response ways including the following.

  • Restaurant Pick-up Zones. With dine-in operations banned, restaurants shifted to takeout/delivery models resulting in congestion at the curb for customers and couriers. Originating in Seattle and propagating rapidly across the country, municipalities reprogrammed segments of their curbside with temporary signage coupled with information campaigns (like the District of Columbia map) showing curbs prioritized for pick-up activity. This ensured curb turnover while supporting local restaurants.
  • Relaxed Curbside Enforcement. Shelter-in-place orders led to more stationary vehicles, which put them in violation of policies encouraging turnover. Cities like Miami, Pittsburgh, and others relaxed parking enforcement to discourage unnecessary community movement.
  • Suspended Parking Space Payment. Some communities suspended parking payment, though they did not make that decision lightly. In many jurisdictions, parking revenue is the operational funding lifeblood of their organizations. For the District, it’s about 10 percent of its annual contribution to the regional transportation system. However, costs to maintain parking payment far outweighed anticipated revenue. Additionally, reducing potential sources of infection, i.e., parking payment kiosks, was also of concern for municipal operators.
  • Prioritized/Designated Essential Service Provider Parking. Hospitals have been the front lines of this pandemic, with many facilities converting off-street parking lots and garages to triage and community testing sites. With limited public transportation services and scarce access to for-hire vehicles as drivers limit their exposure, some healthcare providers are resorting to private vehicles. With on-site parking gone, municipalities have designated curbsides near medical facilities for healthcare facility employees. New York City has issued healthcare provider parking permits to allow them to park wherever is most convenient. This may become an extended concern for other essential service staff in dense, urban areas with limited transit.
  • Expanded Sidewalks. In urban areas in particular, sidewalks are constrained by historical rights of way. That means there may be sidewalks narrower than the minimum six feet recommended by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s “physical distancing” guidelines. Places like New York City have cleared the curb, if not the entire roadway, to facilitate unimpeded, “physically distant” pedestrian routes.

These are but a few strategies that are part of cohesive and holistic community responses to the COVID-19 pandemic. If you have a good story, please share it with benito.perez@dc.gov.

Benito O. Pérez is the curbside management operations planning manager at the District Department of Transportation in Washington, D.C.

David C. Lipscomb is a curbside management planner at the District Department of Transportation in Washington, D.C.