Tag Archives: parking

Free Online Shoptalk: Curb Management in the Real World: Case Studies and Conversation, Moderated by Robert Ferrin and Brandy Stanley, CAPP

Curb Management in the Real World: Case Studies and Conversation, Moderated by Robert Ferrin, City of Columbus, Ohio and Brandy Stanley, CAPP, City of Las Vegas Parking Services


Register for free here.

Join IPMI for our next online Shoptalk addressing the parking, transportation, and mobility industry’s response and recovery planning. Open to all, join us for discussions centered on best practices, next steps, and the challenges ahead.

Curbside management continued its leap to prominence even as COVID-19 decimated traditional parking demand. From deliveries to passenger pick-up and drop-off to restaurant and retail curbside service, on-street dining, public transit and beyond, managing who uses the curb, for how long, and sometimes for how much—and how drivers can plan for it—is a big priority in cities and operations around the world. Join us for real-world case studies from Columbus, Ohio, and Las Vegas, Nev., including great ideas that worked, the technology coming to the forefront, lessons learned, and beyond.


Moderators

Robert Ferrin

As Assistant Director for Parking Services, Robert Ferrin oversees the administration, enforcement, operations, and management of public parking for the City of Columbus, Ohio. In June 2019, he was elected to the International Parking and Mobility Institute (IPMI) Board of Directors. Robert moved to Columbus in late 2017 from Colorado, where he spent nearly seven years working in various parking leadership roles with the City and County of Denver as their Manager of On-Street Programs and the City of Aurora as their Parking & Mobility Manager. He is a graduate of the University of North Carolina at Charlotte, where he earned bachelor’s and master’s degrees in geography.

Brandy Stanley, CAPP

Brandy Stanley, CAPP, has served as the Parking Services Manager for the city of Las Vegas since 2011 and has been in parking for almost 30 years. In this role, she oversees all aspects of the city’s parking system including the operation of parking meters, enforcement, collections, off-street facility management, and contract negotiations. She is also responsible for technology evaluation and implementation, supporting new development with parking expertise, and setting the direction and mission for how the parking system can best support the city’s economic development goals. Brandy earned a bachelor’s degree in business administration from the University of Washington and an MBA from the University of Texas at Austin.

September 1, 2021: Free Online Shoptalk: Hospital/Medical Center Parking and Mobility: Unique Challenges and Solutions

Hospital/Medical Center Parking and Mobility: Unique Challenges and Solutions, Moderated by George Richardson, CAPP, UF Health Shands Hospital

Register for free here.

Join IPMI for our next online Shoptalk addressing the parking, transportation, and mobility industry’s response and recovery planning. Open to all, join us for discussions centered on best practices, next steps, and the challenges ahead.

Seattle Reviewing 72-hour On-street Parking Rule

street in SeattleCaught between advocates for people living in recreational vehicles, vans, and other cars, and businesses who say such vehicles using on-street parking long-term keep customers away, the City of Seattle is revisiting its rule that says vehicles can’t stay in the same on-street space for more than 72 hours in the city.

The rule was suspended in April 2020,when COVID-19 kept many people home from work and regular shopping and outings, which meant they weren’t using their cars as much. It was reinstated this past April, and that set off controversy: Homeless people live in vehicles and, advocates say, asking them to move every three days is unfair; businesses, on the other hand, say vehicles that don’t move regularly clog streets and create garbage and crime that keep customers away.

It’s a conundrum being seen by an increasing number of municipalities. For its part, Seattle says it will revisit the rule to balance all needs as COVID-19 continues to affect travel patterns and lifestyles.

Unsung Heroes Transform Downtown

A man strikes a contemplative pose as his shadow that is cast on the wall behind him shows him in a confident stance and wearing a cape.By Dave Feehan

Too often, people working behind the scenes never get the credit and recognition they deserve. In 1989, when I arrived in Kalamazoo, Mich., as the new president of Downtown Kalamazoo Incorporated, the challenges were many. The downtown hotel and conference center was failing. Occupancy at the hotel was below 25 percent. Arcadia Creek, at one time a small creek running from the Western Michigan University campus to the Kalamazoo River, had been boxed in and made part of the sewer system, eventually creating a 100-year flood plain in the north half of downtown. Older buildings had been abandoned, and some were collapsing from neglect. There was no downtown housing to speak of, and retail sales were departing for the suburban malls.

An ambitious plan to rebuild the creek and make it an attractive water feature was designed by Skidmore Owings and Merrill but was never built. Then, a group of community leaders, both public and private, decided that something must be done. The city applied for an Urban Development Action Grant (UDAG), and secured the last one HUD awarded. That set in motion a revised plan, involving a purchase and renovation of the hotel by the Upjohn Company, transfer of the parking system to the downtown organization, and agreements by the Community College and other entities to build along Arcadia Creek. The project became known as Arcadia Commons.

Leading the effort were people like Dr. Marilyn Schlack, president of the Community College; Martha Parfet, an influential member of the Upjohn family; and Dr. Jack Hopkins, president of the Kalamazoo Community Foundation. But working quietly behind the scenes were people like Ken Nacci, vice president of Downtown Kalamazoo Incorporated, who managed the finances for the Downtown Development Authority; Blaine Lam, who produced all of the promotional materials; Mike O’Connor, the attorney for the Downtown Development Authority; and Clayton Johnston, a men’s wear proprietor who chaired the boards of all of the downtown organizations.

The result was the entire transformation of downtown Kalamazoo, and the creation of an award winning parking system. But none of this would have happened without the essential but unheralded work of some extraordinary individuals.

Dave Feehan is president of Civitas Consultants, LLC.

Embracing “E” Words for Campus Mobility

College student wearing a mask and biking on campus.By Sarah Blouch, Carl DePinto, Zachary Pearce, and Keith Palma

Initiating changes to parking and mobility systems on college campuses can be difficult and frustrating for campus parking professionals. New solutions to old problems abound as technology and innovation flourish in the industry. But the fear of the unknown, competing needs for a scarce resource that require established priorities, and the inability to gain consensus (much less a direction) on those critical priorities are all frequent reasons why university leaders tend to resist making changes. They have enough challenges to deal with at any given time, so why create more?

Well, it turns out there is nothing like a good crisis to help the evolution of change move forward! While the pandemic forced everyone into crises management mode for the past 15 months, we have now shifted into planning for a “new normal” and at the same time, seizing opportunities to implement long-desired changes to make our systems more effective for the customer and efficient for operations. Flexible and scalable parking options to address hybrid work schedules, protocols around cleanliness and social distancing, and event parking changes to better manage traffic and enhance safety for the sellers are all now possible (and in many cases required) to manage the long-term aftereffects of COVID-19.

It is time to embrace the ”E” words: Evolutions in operations to Enhance Efficiency and Effectiveness.

Carl DePinto and Zach Pearce are with Duke University and Duke Health; and Sarah Blouch and Keith Palma are with CampusParc. They will present on this topic at the 2021 IPMI Parking & Mobility Conference & Expo, Nov. 29 – Dec. 2, in Tampa, Fla.

Online Instructor Led Learning: Wicked Problem Solving – May 11, 2021

REGISTER HERE.

You’ll notice that we have launched your new member portal.  If you have questions or need assistance, please contact info@parking-mobility.org


Non-Members may attend for a $300 registration fee.  NOT A MEMBER? JOIN TODAY.


Wicked Problem Solving

In this intermediate-level course, industry leaders will be provided wicked problems and practice how to solve them. Learn what makes a problem wicked. The easy problems are solved, the ones left for executives are wicked.

Objectives:

  • Learn about your approach to problem-solving and those of others.
  • Practice identifying the three aspects that make a problem wicked and recognize steps on how to solve them.
  • Practice identifying wicked problems given current real-life scenarios that the industry is facing due to COVID-19.
  • Identify the people problems that impede solutions.

This is a two-day course.  Offers 4 CAPP points or .4 CEU’s toward application or recertification.


Instructor:

Dr. Andrea Hornett

Andrea Hornett taught strategy at Penn State and is retired from the business faculty at Temple University, Philadelphia, PA. Dr. Andy researched virtual teams at Xerox, earning her doctorate at George Washington University. She has more than a hundred presentations and peer-reviewed publications in organizational problem solving and learning, leadership, ethics, and knowledge transfer. In her extensive business career, she developed and consulted on global strategies and organizational solutions (e.g. DuPont Pharmaceuticals, The GAP, National Alliance of Business, Manufacturers’ Association of the Delaware Valley).

Online Instructor Led Learning: Wicked Problem Solving – May 13, 2021

REGISTER HERE.

You’ll notice that we have launched your new member portal.  If you have questions or need assistance, please contact info@parking-mobility.org


Non-Members may attend for a $300 registration fee.  NOT A MEMBER? JOIN TODAY.


Wicked Problem Solving

In this intermediate-level course, industry leaders will be provided wicked problems and practice how to solve them. Learn what makes a problem wicked. The easy problems are solved, the ones left for executives are wicked.

Objectives:

  • Learn about your approach to problem-solving and those of others.
  • Practice identifying the three aspects that make a problem wicked and recognize steps on how to solve them.
  • Practice identifying wicked problems given current real-life scenarios that the industry is facing due to COVID-19.
  • Identify the people problems that impede solutions.

This is a two-day course.  Offers 4 CAPP points or .4 CEU’s toward application or recertification.


Instructor:

Dr. Andrea Hornett

Andrea Hornett taught strategy at Penn State and is retired from the business faculty at Temple University, Philadelphia, PA. Dr. Andy researched virtual teams at Xerox, earning her doctorate at George Washington University. She has more than a hundred presentations and peer-reviewed publications in organizational problem solving and learning, leadership, ethics, and knowledge transfer. In her extensive business career, she developed and consulted on global strategies and organizational solutions (e.g. DuPont Pharmaceuticals, The GAP, National Alliance of Business, Manufacturers’ Association of the Delaware Valley).

Online Instructor Led Learning: Wicked Problem Solving – October 21, 2021

 

 

Register here for this event. $150 for IPMI Members


Non-Members may attend for a $300 registration fee. Click the register link above to attend as a non-member.  Need help logging in?

Contact us at professionaldevelopment@parking-mobility.org.

NOT A MEMBER? JOIN TODAY.


Wicked Problem Solving

In this intermediate-level course, industry leaders will be provided with wicked problems and practice how to solve them. Learn what makes a problem wicked. The easy problems are solved, the ones left for executives are wicked.

Objectives:

  • Learn about your approach to problem-solving and those of others.
  • Practice identifying the three aspects that make a problem wicked and recognize steps on how to solve them.
  • Practice identifying wicked problems given current real-life scenarios that the industry is facing due to COVID-19.
  • Identify the people problems that impede solutions.

This is a two-day course.  Offers 4 CAPP points or .4 CEU’s toward application or recertification.

For more information, contact professionaldevelopment@parking-mobility.org


Instructor:

Dr. Andrea Hornett

Andrea Hornett taught strategy at Penn State and is retired from the business faculty at Temple University, Philadelphia, PA. Dr. Andy researched virtual teams at Xerox, earning her doctorate at George Washington University. She has more than a hundred presentations and peer-reviewed publications in organizational problem solving and learning, leadership, ethics, and knowledge transfer. In her extensive business career, she developed and consulted on global strategies and organizational solutions (e.g. DuPont Pharmaceuticals, The GAP, National Alliance of Business, Manufacturers’ Association of the Delaware Valley).

 

Register here.