Tag Archives: management

How’s Your Curbside Management Vocabulary?

Just a few years ago, “curbside management” wasn’t a thing–certainly not a thing anyone talked about. But today, it’s a very big thing, and a specialty many parking and mobility organizations are working to master. Making use of that valuable curbside real estate is a big challenge, and doing it effectively can make a city or campus move much more effectively.

One challenge is that everybody uses different words to describe different facets of curbside management, so having a conversation can be a little muddled. But IPMI’s Research & Innovation Task Force has come to the rescue, working to identify common terms, define them, and package them up into a handy resource for the industry–one that will make collaboration much easier.

The Curbside Management Glossary of Terms is part of the September issue of Parking & Mobility magazine. Use it as a resource, share it with your staff, and get everyone on the same page with the words they use. Your operation and customers will thank you.

The Mighty B17 and its Secret for Success: The Checklist

World War II bomber. Bomb bay doors open. B-17 Flying Fortress.By Matt Penney, CAPP

No one had seen anything like it. The B17 was immediately the new king of its class for large, propeller-driven aircraft. At its unveiling, a reporter dubbed it the “flying fortress” because of the numerous machine guns protruding in all directions from its fuselage. Boeing quickly adopted and trademarked the name and today, the B17 is widely recognized by its iconic shape and renowned for its decisive role in WWII.

This legendary aircraft didn’t have a great beginning. It would actually lose a competitive contract to arguably one of the most forgettable bombers of the era: the Douglas B-18 Bolo.  The B-17 had been outperforming the Bolo in every way and then, the prototype crashed.  The prototype was destroyed and the three crew were killed.

In came to light in the investigation that before takeoff, the (very experienced) test pilot had neglected to disengage the devices that locked the aircraft’s control surfaces while it was on the ground. With the locks in place, the pilot would have been unable to control the aircraft once in flight. Boeing’s solution for the future: a checklist. They determined that the aircraft had become too complex to attempt to manage without one. In this day and age, it’s hard to imagine a world without–let alone a flight without–a checklist.

I love checklists and had no idea of their origin until recently. I believe they help put people and organizations in the best possible situations for success. I see them everywhere–at a vacation theme park with the family, I watched teenagers methodically position themselves and walk through their checklist (with another great safety practice–pointing and calling) right before they launched people, including me, on a high-speed ride.

If you have a complicated or zero-fail task ahead of you, take the time to build a checklist. It is not a reflection of you or your team’s talent; it’s simply about making sure you don’t miss the small stuff.

As the world moves back to into a more active landscape, more pedestrians, buses, bicycles, automobiles, and the numerous forms of alternative transportation are going to be interacting again. It’s possible we might have fallen into some bad procedural habits during COVID. Dust off or update your checklist and put it back in play

Remember, even one of the most iconic aircraft in history would have never reached its legendary status without a checklist.

Matt Penney, CAPP, is director of parking and transportation services at Baylor University and an IPMI industry trainer.

Free Online Shoptalk: Leadership on Their Terms to Ease Stress and Enable Focus


Free Online Shoptalk: Leadership on Their Terms to Ease Stress and Enable Focus

Download the Shoptalk here.

IPMI invites all industry professionals in parking, transportation, and mobility to discuss how the COVID-19 crisis has impacted your various mobility programs and options, including how we plan for municipal on street operations post COVID-19.

Now more than ever, empathy, self-awareness, and sensitivity are key aspects to leading teams and maintaining healthy relationships (just ask any celebrity busted on social media for complaining about cabin fever from their palatial home). Meeting employees where their heads are to communicate change, celebrate success, and break bad news are the leadership qualities that win the day in today’s environment.

If you’re leading others and, would like to go from good to better or haven’t really had to lean on these aspects of leadership until now, this online Shoptalk will be well worth your time. Join Colleen Niese and Vicki Pero from The Marlyn Group for a highly interactive session to discuss key strategies and take away easy-to-implement tactics to ensure your leadership from a distance will:

Objectives:

  • Make decisions that consider team members needs in a COVID-19 world.
  • Help manage stress for your team and you(!).
  • Support all in accomplishing the work at hand with as much focus as can be expected.

Moderator: 

Niese headshotColleen M. Niese, SPHR understanding of what makes a business tick comes from her nearly 25 years of parking industry experience, and her insatiable curiosity about high-performing business.

With a background in leading an international shared services center to then consulting in strategic HR and customer service to now overseeing new business development, sales and client relations for Zephire, the people-first complete monthly parking solution, Colleen is well versed when it comes to a parking operator’s priorities in managing seamless monthly parking.  She possesses a unique skillset to listen to a client’s needs and connecting Zephire’s holistic solution to each individual’s expectation.  In her spare time, Colleen is a hopeless Cleveland Browns fan (there’s always next year!).

Gibbs’ Rules and Rules to Live By

Chalk board with rules writtenBy Katherine Beaty

NCIS is a CBS series that is now on its 18th season. The main character is Special Agent Leroy Jethro Gibbs, who is the leader of a team of special agents belonging to the NCIS (Naval Criminal Investigative Service) Major Case Response Team. Gibbs, a former Marine, is a tough investigator and a highly skilled interrogator who relies on his gut instinct as much as evidence. His team of elite agents, based in Washington, D.C., solve criminal cases involving Marine and Navy personnel and their families, sometimes traveling the U.S.–or the world–to do it.

One of the hidden gems on this show that all fans talk about at some point when they meet is Gibbs’ Rules. Gibbs teaches his team members all these rules, which he feels they need to do their jobs. While I will not go into all 51 rules, I will share that seven of the rules directly concern lawyers, and rules 40 and above are not rules of everyday life, but are for emergencies.

This got me thinking–what is my code? What are the “rules” I live by? Here are just a few:

  • Never let the world change who you want to be.
  • Listen to and embrace music every day.
  • Trust but verify.
  • Put good out and good will come back.
  • Work hard, play hard.

What are some rules you live by?

Katherine Beaty is vice president, implementation, with TEZ Technology.

Leading Through Exhaustion

Young woman in office looking exhaustedBy Kathleen Federici, MEd

As I hear stories from others, a common theme is exhaustion. The pandemic has taken a toll on all of us in some way or another and unexpected and rapid changes have left some in a state of fatigue. Not only are we dealing with the effects of the pandemic, but life goes on and things we don’t necessarily want to happen can and do, often without warning.

The universe has met me where I am  and emailed me an unsolicited article from the Chronicle of Higher Education, written by Denise Magner titled Your Career: Leading Through Emotional Exhaustion. I laughed when I saw this in my inbox because I have never received any email from the Chronicle of Higher Education previously and the timing made me shake my head as I am working through a personal challenge at the moment.

The article describes that if a leader is stressed, he or she still must  motivate and raise morale. How can this be possible when they are feeling the opposite?

The Mayo Clinic defines emotional exhaustion as “when stress begins to accumulate from negative or challenging events in life that just keep coming.” A mishandled conversation due to stress or exhaustion between a manager and an employee can do a lot of long-term damage. It is important to understand how others process information before you begin a heavy conversation. Get to know their side of the story before taking action. Be gentle. Recognize that one or two bad days do not negate contributions as a whole. No leader wants to lose a valuable employee, especially currently.

It’s normal to be exhausted and at times struggle with how to lead. Advice that I took from this article is to take one day at a time and be relatable. Do your best to be approachable. And remember we are all going through stuff, some heavier than others, so be gentle and practice empathy as you lead.

Kathleen Federici, MEd, is IPMI’s director of professional development.

7 on 7

Two boys in football uniforms posing for the cameraBy Matt Penney, CAPP

With the close of the spring semester and the onset of summertime, there is a brief window for a sport called “7 on 7.” It’s a modified touch football game for high school students. There are no linemen, no running plays, and no rushing of the quarterback. Every play is a passing play. Some credit 7 on 7 with the rise of pass-happy college football offenses (now even seen in professional football).  It’s fast-paced and fun to watch.

The fan atmosphere is small and relaxed. So I find the best spot for my folding camping chair on the fringe of the field. It’s the last year my boy will get to play and I’m just trying to soak it all in. My son is more fortunate than he realizes–his coaches are both good coaches and good men. It’s a rare combination.

In these fast-paced games, there are no timeouts, no team huddles, and the players call their own plays. There isn’t time for lengthy explanations or the drawing up of movie-famed special plays. There is little opportunity for coaching interjections, but three distinct phrases are repetitive and noteworthy:

  • Focus:  Trash talk is a challenging distraction to ignore. This applies to athletes on a field or to adult staff in a parking lot. Focus–pay attention to the things that matter and execute those things without reacting or being distracted.
  • Next Play:  We all make mistakes. A blown coverage resulting in the opposing team scoring or a missed software detail resulting in a more public embarrassment. Next Play–getting lost in a fog about what could have been doesn’t change the past. Learn and stay in the game, look for opportunities in the next play.
  • Find a Way:  Tired, against the wall, don’t know how to get it done? Welcome to life. Find a Way–to overcome, to adapt, to rewrite the script. It doesn’t have to be perfect or even pretty.  All that is needed is a way to get the job done.

At some point the season will end and the cleats will get hung up. If these young men were listening, there were a couple of good nuggets of wisdom that would benefit them beyond the field they were playing on.

Matt Penney, CAPP, is director of transportation services at Baylor University and an IPMI trainer.

Parksmart Advisor Training – October 22, 2020

Parksmart Advisors lead clients through the certification process for sustainable parking structures. The Parksmart program is now offered under by the USGBC/GBCI alongside the suite of LEED and other sustainability rating systems. IPMI is the USGBC Education Partner providing the education required to earn this valuable certificate.

This is a four-day course. The class will take place on each of the four specified days from 11:00 a.m. EST until 12:30 p.m. EST:

  • October 13
  • October 15
  • October 20
  • October 22

You must attend all four sessions and pass the end of course assessment to become a Parksmart Advisor. All Parksmart Advisors are listed on USGBC’s website. Due to the online interactive nature of this course, this course is limited to 14 attendees.

Cost:

  • Member rate: $325
  • Non-member rate: $425
  • Bulk rate discount of 20% available for organizations that enroll seven or more individuals.  Please contact professionaldevelopment@parking-mobility.org to enroll your organization.

Learning Objectives:

  • Illustrate and detail the specific management, programmatic, technological, and structural elements of certification
  • Evaluate a parking facility, including the tools, process, and procedures for submitting facilities for certification
  • Evaluate case examples against the Standard and determine acceptability or changes.
  • Illustrate acceptable versus non-acceptable evidence for certification application.
  • Review the Parksmart scorecard.

Course Credits: 9 CAPP Points/.90 CEUs

register

 

 

For more information, contact professionaldevelopment@parking-mobility.org.

Parksmart Advisor Training – October 20, 2020

Parksmart Advisors lead clients through the certification process for sustainable parking structures. The Parksmart program is now offered under by the USGBC/GBCI alongside the suite of LEED and other sustainability rating systems. IPMI is the USGBC Education Partner providing the education required to earn this valuable certificate.

This is a four-day course. The class will take place on each of the four specified days from 11:00 a.m. EST until 12:30 p.m. EST:

  • October 13
  • October 15
  • October 20
  • October 22

You must attend all four sessions and pass the end of course assessment to become a Parksmart Advisor. All Parksmart Advisors are listed on USGBC’s website. Due to the online interactive nature of this course, this course is limited to 14 attendees.

Cost:

  • Member rate: $325
  • Non-member rate: $425
  • Bulk rate discount of 20% available for organizations that enroll seven or more individuals.  Please contact professionaldevelopment@parking-mobility.org to enroll your organization.

Learning Objectives:

  • Illustrate and detail the specific management, programmatic, technological, and structural elements of certification
  • Evaluate a parking facility, including the tools, process, and procedures for submitting facilities for certification
  • Evaluate case examples against the Standard and determine acceptability or changes.
  • Illustrate acceptable versus non-acceptable evidence for certification application.
  • Review the Parksmart scorecard.

Course Credits: 9 CAPP Points/9 GBCI Credits

register

 

 

For more information, contact professionaldevelopment@parking-mobility.org.

Parksmart Advisor Training – October 15, 2020

Parksmart Advisors lead clients through the certification process for sustainable parking structures. The Parksmart program is now offered under by the USGBC/GBCI alongside the suite of LEED and other sustainability rating systems. IPMI is the USGBC Education Partner providing the education required to earn this valuable certificate.

This is a four-day course. The class will take place on each of the four specified days from 11:00 a.m. EST until 12:30 p.m. EST:

  • October 13
  • October 15
  • October 20
  • October 22

You must attend all four sessions and pass the end of course assessment to become a Parksmart Advisor. All Parksmart Advisors are listed on USGBC’s website. Due to the online interactive nature of this course, this course is limited to 14 attendees.

Cost:

  • Member rate: $325
  • Non-member rate: $425
  • Bulk rate discount of 20% available for organizations that enroll seven or more individuals.  Please contact professionaldevelopment@parking-mobility.org to enroll your organization.

Learning Objectives:

  • Illustrate and detail the specific management, programmatic, technological, and structural elements of certification
  • Evaluate a parking facility, including the tools, process, and procedures for submitting facilities for certification
  • Evaluate case examples against the Standard and determine acceptability or changes.
  • Illustrate acceptable versus non-acceptable evidence for certification application.
  • Review the Parksmart scorecard.

Course Credits: 9 CAPP Points/9 GBCI Credits

register

 

 

For more information, contact professionaldevelopment@parking-mobility.org.

Parksmart Advisor Training – October 13, 2020

Parksmart Advisors lead clients through the certification process for sustainable parking structures. The Parksmart program is now offered under by the USGBC/GBCI alongside the suite of LEED and other sustainability rating systems. IPMI is the USGBC Education Partner providing the education required to earn this valuable certificate.

This is a four-day course. The class will take place on each of the four specified days from 11:00 a.m. EST until 12:30 p.m. EST:

  • October 13
  • October 15
  • October 20
  • October 22

You must attend all four sessions and pass the end of course assessment to become a Parksmart Advisor. All Parksmart Advisors are listed on USGBC’s website. Due to the online interactive nature of this course, this course is limited to 14 attendees.

Cost:

  • Member rate: $275
  • Non-member rate: $495
  • Bulk rate discount of 20% available for organizations that enroll seven or more individuals.  Please contact professionaldevelopment@parking-mobility.org to enroll your organization.

Learning Objectives:

  • Illustrate and detail the specific management, programmatic, technological, and structural elements of certification
  • Evaluate a parking facility, including the tools, process, and procedures for submitting facilities for certification
  • Evaluate case examples against the Standard and determine acceptability or changes.
  • Illustrate acceptable versus non-acceptable evidence for certification application.
  • Review the Parksmart scorecard.

Course Materials:

All participants are required to purchase the Parksmart Standard in addition to the cost of the course.  To purchase the Standard, click here – https://www.usgbc.org/resources/parksmart-certification-standard

Course Credits: 9 CAPP Points/9 GBCI Credits

register

 

 

For more information, contact professionaldevelopment@parking-mobility.org.