Tag Archives: EV

Growing List of Cities Requiring New Buildings to Include EV Parking

person charging an electric vehicleWashington, D.C., has joined the growing list of cities that are requiring new buildings to include EV parking in their plans.

As reported by Smart Cities Dive, new and refurbished commercial and multi-unit buildings in Washington, D.C., that have at least three off-road parking spaces will be required to make at least 20% of those spaces available to accommodate electric vehicle (EV) charging infrastructure, under a new law that took effect this year.

The new requirement came in response to public concern that families in apartment buildings or without garages did not have access to EV chargers, a barrier to purchasing a car. The make-ready rule is part of the city’s goal to have at least 25% of new vehicles registered by 2035 be zero-emissions. Similar make-ready requirements have been adopted or introduced over the past year in cities including Orlando, Florida, Pittsburgh and Salt Lake City as part of a broad effort to increase EV access.

 

New Life for Old Batteries

Electric Car Battery PackBy Leslie L. Stone, CAPP

Although the internal combustion engine is not yet on life support, the lockstep march toward zero emissions is certainly well underway. The supply of petroleum-based fuels is finite and no one is arguing against cleaner air. California is leading the way with an executive order that mandates that all new cars and passenger trucks sold in the state be zero emissions by 2035. It stands to reason that other progressive states, and ultimately an order at the federal level, are not too far behind. Major vehicle producers are announcing additions to their EV line-up, including a 1000HP Hummer by GMC.

With electric vehicles come batteries–lots and lots of batteries. Research and development have been able to extend the life of these batteries, but ultimately these storage devices will continue to have a limited useful life for the foreseeable future. How many batteries are we talking about? A recent article in Pocket predicts “12M tons of lithium-ion batteries are expected to retire between now and 2030.”

What can be done with this tsunami of batteries that are past their initial useful life? The most predictable answer is recycling. However, there is another school of thought proposing that a second life as storage cells may actually be the better answer for society and for the environment. It would be interesting to see some of these batteries resurrected to store solar energy in meters or charging stations at the curb, in lots, or in parking decks. From an initial life in mobility to a second life in parking, it is an innovative idea worth considering.

Leslie L. Stone, CAPP, is general manager with National Express Transit.

Member News: Blink Charging Acquires Blue Corner, Expanding European EV Charging Footprint

– Acquisition adds 7,071 charging ports to Blink’s portfolio across four countries in Western Europe

Miami Beach, FL – May 11, 2021 – Blink Charging Co. (Nasdaq: BLNK, BLNKW) (“Blink” or the “Company”), a leading owner, operator, and provider of electric vehicle (EV) charging equipment and services, today announced that it acquired the European EV charging operator Blue Corner N.V., based in Antwerp, Belgium, and its portfolio of 7,071 charging ports and a robust European charging network. The acquisition was made with a combination of cash and stock for €20 million (or approximately $24 million) and gives Blink complete operational control of Blue Corner and its EV charging assets. The acquisition is part of Blink’s broader strategic international expansion plans and provides the Company a significant infrastructure footprint in the region. Blue Corner chargers are located across Belgium, Luxembourg, the Netherlands, and France.

Blink’s European expansion allows the Company to capitalize on the robust European EV industry immediately. “EVs enjoy a much higher market share in Europe. This brings increased utilization for EV charging stations. In addition, the historically higher price of fuel makes driving an EV a stronger value proposition for drivers,” stated Blink Founder and Chief Executive Officer Michael D. Farkas.

The European EV market is growing faster than the United States. Sales of plug-in electric vehicles in Europe rose 137% to 1.4 million vehicles last year, whereas U.S. sales rose 4% to 328,000, according to ev-volumes.com. The surge in EV adoption will increase demand for EV charging infrastructure. In addition, European regulations are further accelerating widespread EV adoption regulatory support for zero-emission vehicles.

“We are very excited about this acquisition and the opportunity it provides Blink to have a significant presence in Europe quickly. As a key contributor to the expanding EV landscape, we are continuously looking for opportunities to strategically increase our global assets while also making EV charging more accessible. International expansion is fundamental to our rapid growth and will accelerate the success we are already achieving in the region,” stated Farkas. “Our aggressive international strategy complements a series of significant domestic wins and new contracts that have exponentially expanded our network in the US.”

“Blue Corner’s mission is to build a sustainable society and be ready for tomorrow’s driver. Since Blink shares this philosophy, it was a logical step to join forces. I am convinced that Blue Corner, as part of Blink Charging, can acquire a strong market presence throughout Europe. This acquisition allows us to significantly strengthen both our financial and organizational structure,” shared Peter Buyckx, Managing Director of Blue Corner.

To facilitate Blink’s European expansion, the Company also announced the formation of Blink Holdings B.V., a new Dutch company in Amsterdam, which will drive the growth of Blink’s European presence. The existing Blue Corner operations, management team, and personnel will remain unchanged following the acquisition.

Blink formally entered the European market in September 2019 with Blink Charging Hellas, a joint venture between Blink Charging Co. and Eunice Energy Group. The partnership began with the first deployment of Blink electric vehicle charging stations in Greece as part of the green energy electrification of the Rio-Antirrio “Charilaos Trikoupis” Bridge. Significant subsequent announcements have been made, including a partnership of Blink Charging Hellas and Nissan Nik. I. Theocharakis S.A and the purchase of 45 dual-port Blink charging stations by Public Power Company (PPC S.A.) for deployment across Greece. This tender by PPC S.A. was the first following the utility’s public announcement to enter into the Greek EV charging market with 10,000 charging stations. Also, in September 2019, Blink announced its first deployments of EV charging stations in Israel through its wholly-owned subsidiary Blink Charging Ltd.


ABOUT BLINK CHARGING

Blink Charging Co. (Nasdaq: BLNK, BLNKW) is a leader in electric vehicle (EV) charging equipment and has deployed over 23,000 charging stations, many of which are networked EV charging stations, enabling EV drivers to easily charge at any of the Company’s charging locations worldwide. Blink Charging’s principal line of products and services include its Blink EV charging network (“Blink Network”), EV charging equipment, and EV charging services. The Blink Network uses proprietary, cloud-based software that operates, maintains, and tracks the EV charging stations connected to the network and the associated charging data. With global EV purchases forecasted to rise to 10 million by 2025 from approximately 2 million in 2019, the Company has established key strategic partnerships for rolling out adoption across numerous location types, including parking facilities, multifamily residences and condos, workplace locations, health care/medical facilities, schools and universities, airports, auto dealers, hotels, mixed-use municipal locations, parks and recreation areas, religious institutions, restaurants, retailers, stadiums, supermarkets, and transportation hubs. For more information, please visit https://www.blinkcharging.com/.

ABOUT BLUE CORNER

Blue Corner started in 2011 as one of the pioneers of charging points for electric vehicles. Based on its sustainable mission, the supplier and manager of EV charging facilities wants to make electric driving easy and accessible for everyone. Blue Corner focuses on smart and comprehensive 360° solutions with subscriptions for professionals, the general public and partners. Its rapidly growing network has over 7,000 charging points spread across Belgium, the Netherlands, Luxembourg and France. Blue Corner’s public charging card makes a total of 250,000 charging points accessible in the rest of Europe. The company has 30 employees and is headquartered in Antwerp. www.bluecorner.be

Blink Media Contact: PR@BlinkCharging.com

Blink Investor Relations Contact: IR@BlinkCharging.com

Member News: San Antonio City Council Names Blink Charging as Provider of EV Charging Infrastructure for the City’s EVSA Program Following Competitive Proposal Process

San Antonio City Council Names Blink Charging as Provider of EV Charging Infrastructure for the City’s EVSA Program Following Competitive Proposal Process

First Phase of EV San Antonio program to include up to 140 Blink Owned Level 2 Charging Ports and 3 DC Fast Chargers


Miami Beach, FL – February 9, 2020 – Blink Charging Co. (Nasdaq: BLNK, BLNKW) (“Blink” or the “Company”), a leading owner, operator, and provider of electric vehicle (EV) charging equipment and services, announced an agreement with the City of San Antonio, TX. The award makes Blink Charging the provider of EV charging equipment for the city’s EVSA program aimed at increasing access to public EV charging infrastructure. Initially, the award enlists the Company to deploy up to 140 Blink owned level 2 charging ports and 3 DC fast-charging stations throughout the city.

The Company won the bid after a competitive process. The award was approved by the San Antonio City Council on Thursday, February 4, after a thorough review of Blink, the Blink equipment, services, and team. Blink also was able to offer the city a cost neutral proposal for the EV charging program through the Company’s unique ownership model. Blink and the City of San Antonio will share the ongoing revenue from the charging stations.

“We’re excited to serve as an EV charging operator for the City of San Antonio. It is a testament that the quality of the Blink products and services and the differentiation of our business models which are our key competitive differences in the EV charging industry,” commented Michael D. Farkas, Founder and Chief Executive Officer of Blink.

“As a company, Blink is honored to help the city achieve its climate, sustainability, transportation, and air quality goals. Encouraging widespread adoption of EVs is core to Blink’s mission, and this includes minimizing the barriers to EV charging for all residents.  Texas continues to be a growth market for us and for EVs, and this project will help to increase public awareness by increasing the number of charging options available in the state. We are committed to bringing affordable, convenient, and efficient charging stations to the growing number of EV drivers, and the addition of the stations in San Antonio further enhances our position as a leading provider in the ongoing development of EV infrastructure,” commented Mr. Farkas.

The first phase of this agreement will see 50 dual-port Blink owned chargers deployed in strategic locations around the city. Blink will analyze suggested publicly-accessible sites by conducting thorough assessments across San Antonio in order to identify ideal locations for its IQ 200 Level 2 EV charging stations. This project supports the City’s EV San Antonio program led by the Office of Sustainability. EVSA is a multi-faceted program designed to support electric transportation and EV drivers through education, encouragement, infrastructure, and policy with a focus on equity.

Emissions from the transportation sector are the second largest contributor to San Antonio’s greenhouse gas emissions, according to SA Climate Ready, Climate Action & Adaptation Plan.  Electric vehicles produce zero emissions and will make San Antonio a cleaner and more livable city for all its residents.

To support its business model, Blink plans to apply for grant funds from the state-wide Texas Volkswagen Environmental Mitigation Program (TxVEMP through the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality (TCEQ). This historic $10.4 million fund is specifically for establishing Level 2 charging across Texas in order to improve air quality.

“The City of San Antonio is looking forward to working with Blink on this project. Through our analyses, we know that large sections of our city are without EV charging infrastructure or have limited charging options. We hope that additional charging infrastructure that is publicly-accessible will relieve range anxiety and communicate that San Antonio is an EV-friendly city,” stated San Antonio Deputy Chief Sustainability Officer Julia Murphy.


ABOUT BLINK CHARGING

Blink Charging Co. (Nasdaq: BLNK, BLNKW) is a leader in electric vehicle (EV) charging equipment and has deployed over 23,000 charging stations, many of which are networked EV charging stations, enabling EV drivers to easily charge at any of the Company’s charging locations worldwide. Blink Charging’s principal line of products and services include its Blink EV charging network (“Blink Network”), EV charging equipment, and EV charging services. The Blink Network uses proprietary, cloud-based software that operates, maintains, and tracks the EV charging stations connected to the network and the associated charging data. With global EV purchases forecasted to rise to 10 million by 2025 from approximately 2 million in 2019, the Company has established key strategic partnerships for rolling out adoption across numerous location types, including parking facilities, multifamily residences and condos, workplace locations, health care/medical facilities, schools and universities, airports, auto dealers, hotels, mixed-use municipal locations, parks and recreation areas, religious institutions, restaurants, retailers, stadiums, supermarkets, and transportation hubs. For more information, please visit https://www.blinkcharging.com/.

Forward-Looking Statements

This press release contains forward-looking statements as defined within Section 27A of the Securities Act of 1933, as amended, and Section 21E of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended. These forward-looking statements, along with terms such as “anticipate,” “expect,” “intend,” “may,” “will,” “should,” and other comparable terms, involve risks and uncertainties because they relate to events and depend on circumstances that will occur in the future. Those statements include statements regarding the intent, belief, or current expectations of Blink Charging and members of its management, as well as the assumptions on which such statements are based. Prospective investors are cautioned that any such forward-looking statements are not guarantees of future performance and involve risks and uncertainties, including those described in Blink Charging’s periodic reports filed with the SEC, and that actual results may differ materially from those contemplated by such forward-looking statements. Except as required by federal securities law, Blink Charging undertakes no obligation to update or revise forward-looking statements to reflect changed conditions.

Blink Media Contact: PR@BlinkCharging.com

Blink Investor Relations Contact: IR@BlinkCharging.com

U.K. District Offers Free Parking for Electric Vehicles

EV parking spaceIn response to what it’s calling a “climate emergency,” one district in the United Kingdom plans to offer free parking for electric vehicles. Traditionally-fueled vehicles will continue to pay to park.

The Warwick District Council announced the plan yesterday, offering parking permits at no charge to drivers of EVs; it appears hybrid cars do not qualify for the offer. The cost to park for other drivers will increase slightly, at least for stays of more than four hours. The Council said the plan is designed to get people thinking more about buying electric-powered vehicles and driving less overall.

Read the whole story here.

The California City Embracing the Future of EVs

By Taylor Kim, AIA, LEED AP

HOME TO ELECTRIC VEHICLE (EV) PIONEER TESLA, it is no surprise that the city of Palo Alto, Calif., leads the nation in electric vehicle sales at nearly 30 percent of new cars sold. As the city has embraced this technology and its role as an EV am­bassador, it has enacted some of the most robust EV parking requirements in the country.

In 2014, Palo Alto established itself as a pioneer of EV legislation when it passed a first-of-its-kind law that required new homes, apartments, office buildings, and hotels to be wired for EV charging. To encour­age adoption, the city offered a variety of incentives such as free EV charging; a $30,000 rebate to offices and residential complexes that install chargers; and a streamlined permit process for residential EV parking. The city’s current goal is to have 6,000 residential EVs by 2020 and 19,000 by 2030. This proactive legisla­tion has proven remarkably successful; Palo Alto’s EV charging spaces are currently at around 40 percent occupancy.

The Cost
Providing this much EV infrastructure comes at a high cost. According to the U.S. Department of Energy, a single level 2 charging station—Palo Alto’s standard—can cost up to $65,000 with an additional $12,700 for installation. EV charging points also lead to an in­crease in electricity demand; Palo Alto projects a 6 to 7 percent increase when EVs dominate the automobile market. However, when this infrastructure is includ­ed during initial construction verses a future retrofit, much of the cost can be mitigated.

Armed with this knowledge, when Palo Alto needed more public parking to support a new public safety building planned for downtown, the city saw an opportunity to invest in the electrical future they wished to achieve. When the new California Avenue parking structure opens in 2020, 25 percent of the 630 parking spaces will be wired for EV charging, with 5 percent, or 32 spaces, accessible on its first day of operation. The remaining 125 spaces will have wiring in place so that charging stations can be installed in the future.

Challenges
Such ambitious EV requirements pose unique design challenges to accommodate the increase in both electrical capacity and load. The transformer at the California Avenue Garage had to be upsized to be able to accommodate chargers for 125 future EV spaces. To lessen the overall power demand, 95 percent of the EV spaces in the facility will use power-sharing dual chargers. When two cars are plugged into a dual charger, each will receive 50 percent power, which will decrease the electrical requirements by almost half of that used by single chargers.

Providing sufficient EV accessibility requires careful consideration as well. The Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) does not provide a national standard when it comes to EV, but the state of California has stringent requirements when it comes to EV accessibility. For the California Avenue Garage, this means the number of required EV accessible charging spaces is calcu­lated based on the facility’s total number of charging stations rather than the total number of accessible spaces, increasing the number of accessible spaces re­quired. Providing the additional spaces and clearances to accommodate this can in turn affect the overall stall count and efficiency.

When the new California Avenue parking structure opens in 2020, 25 percent of the 630 parking spaces will be wired for EV charging, with 5 percent, or 32 spaces, accessible on its first day of operation. The remaining 125 spaces will have wiring in place so that charging stations can be installed in the future.

Looking Ahead
As demand for EV charging continues to increase, effi­cient utilization of charging infrastructure will become more and more important. Cars that monopolize spaces long after they are done charging mean less charging for others who need it. For example, when someone parks in an EV charging space on an office campus, that person isn’t likely to move his or her car when it is finished charging so someone else can use the space. That means a single space may only charge one car throughout the workday. To address this, some Palo Alto office campuses, such as Facebook, use EV valets who unplug a car once it is fully charged and move the cable to the next car.

Such adaptations are critical to the development of EV infrastructure and important to bear in mind when consider­ing the projected future of EVs in the United States. While EV sales currently make up only 2 percent of the national market share, by 2025 that number is expected to increase to 7 per­cent, with around 1.1 million EVs sold. Other automakers are also hopping on the EV bandwagon. According to Bloomberg, the number of EV models on the market is predicted to dou­ble by 2022. Palo Alto’s accomplishments and dedication to promoting EVs and providing EV infrastructure can help us better understand how to prepare for an electrified future.

Read the article here.

TAYLOR KIM, AIA, LEED AP, is a project manager at Watry Design and a member of IPMI’s Sustainability Committee.. She can be reached at tkim@watrydesign.com.