New Year, New You?

By Michelle W. Jones, CMP

The phrase “auld lang syne” literally translates to “old long since,” and basically means “days gone by.’”* And like in the movie “When Harry Met Sally,” most of don’t really understand the song’s meaning and fake the lyrics as we attempt to sing along each New Year’s Eve.

Another cursory tradition each new year is to make resolutions, like lose 10 pounds, de-clutter your home, call your parents more often, etc.  Sort of a grown-up version of a do-over. We like to think we can make lots of instant changes in our lives. Instead of setting difficult or nebulous goals, however, try to make small changes that are more likely to stick long-term.

I’m focusing on better health–meaning physically, emotionally, professionally, and environmentally.  Working to be healthier, I’m reading Get Lit, by Dr. Lisa Saff Koche, who leads Spectra Wellness Solutions in Tampa, Fla. I’m also committed to walking more this year, and to working out regularly.  This is a better approach than saying, “I must lose X pounds by X date.”

I subscribe to a weekly email called “Take 5 With Mel Robbins,” by the author of The 5 Second Rule, her approach to being more confident and productive. If you are unfamiliar with her, I recommend her TEDx talk. I have also committed to attaining an additional professional designation this year. As a passionate believer in lifelong learning, I think it helps you grow as a person and makes you a better asset to your team.

Whatever you’ve committed to changing or doing this new year, take small steps… minor changes that are easier to apply. This approach will lessen frustration and will increase your chance of success.

*Brandon Specktor, in Reader’s Digest

Michelle W. Jones, CMP, is IPMI’s director of convention and meeting services.